Posts tagged ‘Jesus’

September 14, 2012

God the Artist: Sensitivity

“For we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet he did not sin” (Hebrews 4:15 NLT).

“Surely he took up our pain
and bore our suffering,
yet we considered him punished by God,
stricken by him, and afflicted.
But he was pierced for our transgressions,
he was crushed for our iniquities;
the punishment that brought us peace was on him,
and by his wounds we are healed” (Isaiah 53:4-5 NLT).

I don’t know. God just “gets it.” Even when nobody else does.

September 14, 2012

God the Artist: Passion

“For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in Him, should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16 KJV/NKJV).

“You see, at just the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly. Very rarely will anyone die for a righteous person, though for a good person someone might possibly dare to die. But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:6-8 NLT).

“God’s love is meteoric,
his loyalty astronomic,
His purpose titanic,
his verdicts oceanic.
Yet in his largeness
nothing gets lost;
Not a man, not a mouse,
slips through the cracks.

 How exquisite your love, O God!”

(Psalm 36, The Message)

(NOTE: I almost never use MSG, but I was reading it last month as I cycled through the Psalms and well, this hit me).

“I have loved you with an everlasting love;
I have drawn you with unfailing kindness” (Jeremiah 31:3).

When I think about God’s passion, I also think about His attention to detail…

September 13, 2012

God the Artist: Creative

“The heavens and the earth were completed in all their vast array” (Genesis 2:1).

“Then the Lord God formed a man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being” (Genesis 2:7).

“Then the Lord God made a woman from the rib he had taken out of the man, and he brought her to the man” (Genesis 2:22).

“When I consider your heavens,
the work of your fingers,
the moon and the stars,
which you have set in place,
 what is mankind that you are mindful of them,
human beings that you care for them?” (Psalm 8:3-4)

“The heavens declare the glory of God;
the skies proclaim the work of his hands.
 Day after day they pour forth speech;
night after night they reveal knowledge.
 They have no speech, they use no words;
no sound is heard from them.
Yet their voice goes out into all the earth,
their words to the ends of the world.
In the heavens God has pitched a tent for the sun.
It is like a bridegroom coming out of his chamber,
like a champion rejoicing to run his course.
 It rises at one end of the heavens
and makes its circuit to the other;
nothing is deprived of its warmth” (Psalm 19:1-6).

“For you created my inmost being;
you knit me together in my mother’s womb.
 I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made;
your works are wonderful,
I know that full well.
 My frame was not hidden from you
when I was made in the secret place,
when I was woven together in the depths of the earth.
 Your eyes saw my unformed body;
all the days ordained for me were written in your book
before one of them came to be” (Psalm 139:13-16).

“For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do” (Ephesians 2:10).

I’m kind of an astrophysics geek. I love planets, stars, constellations, galaxies, nebula, novas. One day earlier this year, as I was praising God for His immense creation, I heard Him say, “You are more valuable to me than all of that.”

July 10, 2012

July Announcements

Hey, everybody! It’s Lydia Thomas, Executive Facilitator here at FortyOne20 Ministries, and I wanted to let you know about some of the super-exciting and awesome things that are coming up!

Think Big Video Project

If you follow us on Facebook, you already know that principal production for the Think Big video project has been postponed.This will be a three-part project that will include a) a five-minute introductory video to FortyOne20 Ministries and our resources, b) a ten-minute fiction narrative about how art can be used to reach people, and c) a ten-minute documentary about artists in community.

 Pre-production, however, is well under way, with proposals being drawn up currently.  Lord-willing, these proposals will be presented to potential supporters beginning in September until the full financial needs of this project have been met.  If you think you might be interested in supporting this project (in any way – prayer, advice, resources), please contact me (Lydia Thomas) at fortyone20ministries@yahoo.com. I would be more than happy to meet and go over the proposal with you when it becomes publicly available. Through out our time of support-raising we will also be recruiting artists to work with us on this project.

When the financial needs of this project have been met, we will prayerfully move forward into principal production in McKinney, Texas in January 2013. It is not only our goal to produce artistically excellent videos that reach and inform artists and art-observers, but to also be artistically excellent in our production processes by being intentional about discipleship and evangelism amongst  our fellow artists on set.

Lord-willing, in March 2013, these videos will be released to the public via this blog, our social media sites, and youtube. This will mark the launch of our video production division.

More details will be made available beginning September 2012 on a blog dedicated to our video production division. We will keep you posted. 🙂

 

More Content

Starting this week, it is our intention to post three times a week: one article, one artist’s pick/art review, and one new feature, a devotion. As time goes on, it’s possible that we will move to posting five or six times a week. We shall see.

 

Coming Soon

– Wednesday, July 11: First Devotion – Enjoying God

– Thursday, July 12: Photographer Kathleen S. talks about Absolute Beauty

 

Have a blessed day!

 

July 9, 2012

Brave Review

***SPOILER ALERT***: My reviews are intended to get art-observers to engage with what they have already seen and heard and may include some spoilers.  So if you haven’t seen Brave yet, and don’t want to know what happens, you probably don’t want to read this post.

***

“My son, keep your father’s commands
    and do not forsake your mother’s teaching.
Bind them upon your heart forever;
    fasten them around your neck. 
 When you walk, they will guide you;
    when you sleep, they will watch over you;
    when you awake, they will speak to you.
For these commands are a lamp,
    this teaching is a light,
and the corrections of discipline
    are the way to life.”

~Proverbs 6:20-23

Brave is a moral tale. It is a call to abandon pride and self-sustenance for selflessness and community, as with Pixar’s Wall-E except Brave is set in Scotland’s dark ages instead of the future and is presented through a mother-daughter relationship instead of a lonely robot.

I found the following particularly commendable:

– Legends (stories, movies, and in our case, art) teach lessons. This is what I love about Pixar: they are always trying to get something across. (Mind you, I don’t always agree with it, but at least they are trying). This story in particular teaches about how destructive and divisive pride can be and how humility can heal and unite.

– Merida is not ready to get married. Not in a “she wouldn’t be a good wife because she’s not a lady” kind of way, she’s just not emotionally ready to be in that kind of relationship. She’s no less strong, beautiful, or interesting, and the movie gets that across. Her not being ready to get married isn’t portrayed as a slight against her, like it is in a lot of movies today. (Thank you, Pixar).

-Merida is flawed. She doesn’t do her chores singing sweetly like Cinderella and Snow White – in fact, she’s not thrilled about her duties as a lady at all. She actually has to go through a learning process to be more willing to give up what she wants for what is best for everybody.

-Merida and Elinor both have to learn to understand each other. (Yeah, I know. Someday if I have a daughter this is going to come back to haunt me). Merida is certainly self-centered, and it falls to Elinor to try to get her to see beyond herself. Merida is stubborn, doesn’t listen, and gets herself and Elinor into a situation where she has to yield and give up some of the things she wants. Elinor helps Merida get out of the predicament, and in the process, learns the value of being a fighter. Mostly though, Elinor is right. (And so are my parents).

The animation was good, but I thought the character development could have been deeper and the storyline could have been far less predictable. I know it’s intended to be a children’s movie on some level, but I felt that development-wise, Brave reminded me more of Dreamworks than Pixar. 

Overall, I liked Brave. It reminded me of my own relationship with my mom. I would have liked the male characters to have been stronger – not dominating by any means, but more than narcissistic showboaters. Ah well. I guess you can’t have it all. (Until I start making movies, and then we will have it all, haha).

***

Lydia holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio, Television and Film. She is passionate about reaching artists for Jesus Christ. She is also a lot like Merida.